Archive for 'Retired Players'

NFL players to take part in first-ever “Business of Music Boot Camp” at NYU’s Clive Davis Institute of Recorded Music

Program for current & former players runs Feb 27-March 1 in New York

Music legend Clive Davis among instructors

Twenty current and former NFL players will take part in the first-ever Business of Music Boot Camp at New York University’s Clive Davis Institute of Recorded Music in New York, it was announced today.

The program, which runs from February 27-March 1, 2012, is being directed by NFL Player Engagement and the Clive Davis Institute in NYU’s Tisch School of the Arts and offers professional training for creative entrepreneurs in the music industry.

The four-day boot camp will feature interactive workshops focusing on all aspects of the music industry including production, artist development and management, digital music, publishing, marketing and touring. Participants will gain a better understanding of establishing a career in the music industry and how to develop business plans from their creative ideas.

“We continue to look for ways to help educate players and develop their skills for post-NFL careers,” said NFL Vice President of Player Engagement TROY VINCENT.  “This program builds upon the successes of our Business Management & Entrepreneurial program and Broadcast Boot Camp in catering to players’ interests in new disciplines.”

“NFL players know all about competition which will serve them well as they look into potential careers in the fast-paced music industry,” said CLIVE DAVIS, chief creative officer of Sony BMG. The Clive Davis Institute of Recorded Music at NYU is the first of its kind to provide professional business and artistic training toward a Bachelor of Fine Arts degree for aspiring creative entrepreneurs in the music industry.

Faculty members at the Business of Music Boot Camp will include:
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NFL Announces Distribution of $620 Million Legacy Fund Benefit for Pre-’93 Retired Players

The NFL and NFL Players Association have reached agreement on how to distribute to retired players the $620 million “Legacy Fund” that was established as part of the new Collective Bargaining Agreement.

“Nothing the league can do can ever fully express our appreciation to the players who helped build our league,” said Commissioner ROGER GOODELL. “However, the Legacy Fund is a significant step, especially as the benefits apply to the older players.”

The new benefit has three important points:

  • Players will receive these pension increases for their lifetime, not just the duration of the current Collective Bargaining Agreement, and that of their eligible beneficiaries.
  • Current benefit payments to retirees and their beneficiaries/former family members will immediately be increased to no less than $600 per month, regardless of the form of benefit. In addition, this $600 per month floor on benefits will apply for players who are not yet receiving pension payments, based on electing a life annuity or joint & survivor benefit.
  • In addition to the floor of $600 per month, the new Legacy Fund benefit credit will be added to players’ current monthly pension checks. If a player is over 55 and already receiving his pension, then he will receive in his monthly check an additional $124 per season for seasons before 1975, and $108 per season for seasons beginning with 1975 and continuing through 1992. If a player is over 55 and not yet receiving his pension, the additional Legacy Fund payments will be slightly higher when he starts his pension. If a player is under 55 and takes his pension early, his Legacy Fund addition will be lower.

After discussions with the leaders of several retired player groups – including MIKE DITKA, CARL ELLER, BRUCE LAIRD, WILLIE LANIER, GEORGE MARTIN and RON MIX – the formula for pension increases was agreed to by the NFL and NFLPA, and was designed to give larger increases to those retirees who played in the league’s earliest years.

This new benefit applies to more than 4,700 players who were vested in the Bert Bell/Pete Rozelle Player Pension Plan prior to 1993, regardless of whether they are currently receiving a pension check.

Players currently receiving pensions will receive an immediate increase in their payment for seasons before 1993. For players who are not yet receiving their pension, their pension credits for seasons before 1993 will be increased through the Legacy Fund.

Details of the Legacy Fund benefit were communicated today to retirees.

Below are two examples of how the Legacy Fund benefit will greatly increase monthly pension payments to many retired players:

  • There is a 10-year veteran player who retired in the 1960s who has been receiving a $200 monthly pension. The Legacy Fund benefit will increase his monthly check to $1,840.
  • Another 10-year veteran who retired in the 1970s will see his monthly check increase from $165 to $1,810.

CBS: Commissioner Convenes “Historic Meeting” with Retired Players

The NFL Today’s Charley Casserly reported today on the CBS pre-game show that Commissioner Roger Goodell held a “historic meeting” this past week with retired players to discuss the distribution of the $620 million Legacy Fund created by the league’s new collective bargaining agreement.

Casserly reported that Pro Football Hall of Famers Carl Eller (Retired Players Association), Willie Lanier (Hall of Fame Foundation) and Ron Mix (Hall of Fame Foundation) attended the meeting Thursday  with Bruce Laird (Fourth and Goal) and George Martin (NFL Alumni Association). The views of Mike Ditka (Gridiron Greats) were expressed by the commissioner who had met with Ditka one-on-one  earlier in the month on the same issue.

Commissioner Goodell and Jeff Pash, the NFL’s general counsel, will meet next with NFLPA Executive Director DeMaurice Smith and the union to work toward a final agreement on how to distribute the fund.

The additional dispersal of money to approximately 2,500 players who played in the league before 1993 and who already receive an NFL pension will begin shortly after that agreement is reached.


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Former players Rocky Boiman & Nick Ferguson earn U.K. studio analyst posts for 2011 regular-season Sunday

Former NFL players Rocky Boiman and Nick Ferguson have been selected to serve as studio analysts for a 2011 NFL regular-season Sunday on Sky Sports in the United Kingdom. The announcement was made today at the conclusion of the NFL Broadcast Boot Camp in Mt. Laurel, NJ, where Boiman and Ferguson spent the past four days learning the business from talent, producers and executives from each of the NFL’s broadcast partners. This marks the first time in the five years of the NFL Broadcast Boot Camp that players were given the opportunity to earn a broadcast position as a result of their performances. The dates of the Sky Sports assignments for Boiman and Ferguson will be determined closer to the kickoff of the 2011 NFL season.

“This is a tremendous opportunity for Rocky and Nick to get right into the field,” said FOX Sports’ Curt Menefee, who worked with both players at the Broadcast Boot Camp. “Their analysis and colorful personalities will educate and entertain NFL fans in the U.K.”

Added Sky Sports NFL producer Karl Baumann, “This is a chance for us to introduce Rocky and Nick to our U.K. audience and to benefit from their insight and expertise.”

“It is great to be selected from among all the talented players at the Boot Camp,” said Boiman (above), a linebacker and special teams standout who played 103 games in eight NFL seasons with Tennessee (2002-05), Indianapolis (2006-07), Kansas City (2008) and Pittsburgh (2009). Boiman won a Super Bowl ring with the 2006 Colts. “I’m excited to continue my development on Sky Sports this season.”

“This an extraordinary opportunity for me to continue my broadcasting education, especially on Sky Sports in Europe where I won a World Bowl,” said Ferguson (left), who played 132 games at safety for the New York Jets (2000-02), Denver (2003-07) and Houston (2008-09). Ferguson’s teams posted a 77-55 record (.583) in games he played.

Sky Sports is the premier NFL broadcaster in the U.K. and airs 1:00 PM ET and 4:15 PM ET games live every Sunday as well as all Thursday and Saturday night games and all postseason games including the Super Bowl. Based in London, Sky Sports has been televising NFL games for more than two decades. Among notable NFL guest analysts on Sky in recent years were Mike Holmgren, Jerry Rice and Lynn Swann. In addition, FOX Sports’ Troy Aikman and Daryl Johnston served as analysts on Sky’s coverage of NFL Europe games.

The Broadcast Boot Camp is directed by the NFL Player Engagement and NFL Broadcasting departments and covers a wide range of topics with instructors from each of the NFL’s broadcast partners – CBS, ESPN, FOX, NBC, NFL Network, SiriusXM Radio, Westwood One Radio, plus local radio and TV.

Of the 90 players who took part in the Broadcast Boot Camp from 2007-2010, 36 have already earned broadcasting jobs as a result of their participation in the program.

Top performer at Broadcast Boot Camp to serve as U.K. studio show analyst on 2011 regular-season Sunday

For the first time in the five years of the NFL Broadcast Boot Camp, the event directors will select a top performer to serve as a studio analyst for a 2011 NFL regular-season Sunday on Sky Sports in the United Kingdom.

“We are very pleased to be able to offer this opportunity to a member of the NFL Broadcast Boot Camp,” said Sky Sports NFL producer Karl Baumann. “It is a chance for us to introduce a new analyst to our U.K. audience and to benefit from their insight and expertise. We have been lucky to work with some outstanding NFL broadcasters and experts over the years and we are excited to see who will be joining us later this season.”

Sky Sports is the premier NFL broadcaster in the U.K. and airs 1:00 PM ET and 4:15 PM ET games live every Sunday as well as all Thursday and Saturday night games and all postseason games including the Super Bowl. Based in London, Sky Sports has been televising NFL games for more than two decades.  Among notable NFL guest analysts on Sky in recent years were Mike Holmgren, Jerry Rice and Lynn Swann.  In addition, FOX Sports’ Troy Aikman and Daryl Johnston served as analysts on Sky’s coverage of NFL Europe games.

“This is an exciting opportunity for one of our former players to get real-world experience and apply the skills that he learns at the Broadcast Boot Camp,” said Troy Vincent, NFL vice president of player engagement.

The Broadcast Boot Camp, which runs from June 20-23 at NFL Films in Mt. Laurel, NJ, is directed by the NFL Player Engagement and NFL Broadcasting departments and covers a wide range of topics with instructors from each of the NFL’s broadcast partners – CBS, ESPN, FOX, NBC, NFL Network, SiriusXM Radio, Westwood One Radio, plus local radio and TV.

Of the 90 players who took part in the Broadcast Boot Camp from 2007-2010, 36 have already earned broadcasting jobs as a result of their participation in the program. Following are the former NFL players enrolled in the NFL Broadcast Boot Camp:

Player

Team

Tony Banks

BAL, DAL, HOU, STL, WAS

Anthony Becht

ARI, NYJ, TB

LeCharles Bentley

CLE, NO

Rocky Boiman

IND, KC, PIT, TEN

Barrett Brooks

DET, GB, NYG, PHI, PIT

Rob Davis

CHI, GB, KC, NYJ

Nick Ferguson

BUF, CHI, DEN, HOU, NYJ

John Fina

ARI, BUF

Dustin Fox

BUF, MIN, PHI

Antonio Freeman

GB, PHI

Drew Henson

DAL, DET

Dan Klecko

IND, NE, PHI

Caleb Miller

CIN

Tony Stewart

CIN, OAK, PHI

Amani Toomer

NYG

Maurice Williams

DEN, JAX

NFL offers fifth annual “NFL Broadcast Boot Camp”

Sixteen former NFL players, including Antonio Freeman, Drew Henson and Amani Toomer, will take part in the fifth annual NFL Broadcast Boot Camp at NFL Films in Mt. Laurel, New Jersey, it was announced today.

The program, which runs from June 20-23, is directed by the NFL Player Engagement and NFL Broadcasting departments and covers a wide range of topics with instructors from each of the NFL’s broadcast partners – CBS, ESPN, FOX, NBC, NFL Network, SiriusXM Radio, Westwood One Radio, plus local radio and TV.  It will include hands-on work in areas such as tape study, editing, show preparation, radio production, control room operation, studio preparation, production meetings, field reporting and game preparation.  Each player will tape segments as a studio and game analyst and take part in a networking session with television executives.  Each player also will serve as a live radio host on SiriusXM NFL Radio.

Of the 90 players who took part in the Broadcast Boot Camp from 2007-2010, 36 have already earned broadcasting jobs as a result of their participation in the program.

“We continue to look for ways to help players develop skills to enhance their post-NFL careers.  Many of last year’s participants used this program as a career springboard, with some participants returning as instructors in subsequent years,” said NFL Senior Vice President of Labor Policy and Player Engagement Adolpho Birch. 

“Broadcast Boot Camp is an excellent opportunity for former NFL players who are ready to take an important step towards the next chapter of their lives and prepare for a successful career off the field,” said Troy Vincent, NFL Vice President of Player Engagement. “The program provides participants with a comprehensive look at all aspects of the sports broadcasting industry and allows them to develop invaluable professional skills and relationships that can carry them through their post-NFL experience.”

The NFL Broadcast Boot Camp is one of several NFL Player Engagement programs to assist players in preparing for their post-playing careers.  NFL Player Engagement prepares and supports players for life on the field and during their transition to post-football careers. Through NFL Prep, NFL Life, and NFL Next programming, the NFL Player Engagement department assists players in adjusting to life within the NFL, while challenging them to prepare for their next careers after their football-playing days.

Enrollment criteria for the Broadcast Boot Camp include NFL playing experience, essays, and demonstrated interest in media.

Following are the former NFL players enrolled in the NFL Broadcast Boot Camp:

Player

Team

Tony Banks

BAL, DAL, HOU, WAS

Anthony Becht

ARI, NYJ, TB

LeCharles Bentley

CLE, NO

Rocky Boiman

IND, KC, PIT, TEN

Barrett Brooks

DET, GB, NYG, PHI, PIT

Rob Davis

CHI, GB, KC, NYJ

Nick Ferguson

BUF, CHI, DEN, HOU, NYJ

John Fina

ARI, BUF

Dustin Fox

BUF, MIN, PHI

Antonio Freeman

GB, PHI

Drew Henson

DAL, DET

Dan Klecko

IND, NE

Caleb Miller

CIN

Tony Stewart

CIN, OAK, PHI

Amani Toomer

NYG

Maurice Williams

DEN, JAX

 

With more than 400 years of broadcasting experience, following are the NFL broadcasting talent and production staff who will lend their expertise to the program:
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FACT CHECK: DeMaurice Smith at the University of Virginia’s Darden School of Business

NFL Players Association Executive Director DeMaurice Smith recently spoke with MBA students at the University of Virginia’s Darden School of Business.  Smith discussed a wide range of issues on the NFL’s labor negotiations.

Following is a FACT CHECK on a selection of Smith’s answers:

Smith: “You never stop being a trial lawyer. So, really that is the posture of the case. The league is opposing the injunction. If they win, the lockout continues. 1,900 players and their families will be out of work. Their health insurance has been cancelled.”

FACT: All NFL players are eligible to continue their current NFL health insurance under the federal law known as COBRA, under which affected employees are entitled to continue their employer-provided health insurance coverage at their own or their union’s expense. To date, 1,192 players have signed up for COBRA and they have until May 10 to do so.

Smith: “Not even possibly” – answer to question: “At the end of that two-year negotiation period before the lockout, you called the NFL’s final offer possibly the worst deal in sports history?”

FACT: The proposal owners made to the players on March 11 would have paid players $19-20 billion in cash and benefits over the next four years (2011-2014) – a 14 percent increase representing an additional $2 billion compared to the past four years. In addition, the proposal would have:

  • Reduced the offseason program by eliminating five weeks and cutting OTAs from 14 to 10 days.
  • Put limits on full-padded practices in the regular season. 
  • Increased days off. 
  • Increased retirement benefits so that more than 2,000 retired players would have received almost a 60% increase in their pension benefit. 
  • Offered players the opportunity to have lifetime coverage in NFL medical plan. 
  • Offered for the first time to revise disciplinary system so that a third-party neutral arbitrator resolves all drug and steroids cases. 
  • Offered improvements in the disability plan, the 88 Plan, and post-career benefits, including education and career transition programs.

Smith: On how much the March 11 NFL proposal would reduce the players’ share of revenue:  “The day that you sign that deal, the 50 percent number that we had since 1987 goes automatically before the ink is dry on the deal to 45 percent. In Year 1. The deal that we would have signed with the owners would have probably been about a 10-year deal. The ultimate result of us signing this deal would be that within 10 years that 50 percent would be down to 40 percent of all revenue.  As you march forward from that point, by the time we got to the 15th year of a deal, you could see players getting shares of revenues that were in the 30 percent range.”

FACT: Smith’s statement is based on the flawed assumption that the current deal — which everyone agrees was one-sided for the players — would have stayed in place and just marched ever onward with no re-balancing. It assumes revenue growth that may or may not materialize. No one knows how many, if any, new stadiums will be built, as one example. There are none currently in the pipeline. The statement ignores the explicit commitment in the NFL’s March 11 proposal to a “true up/reset” in 2015, the same year the union wanted to reset the share coming off a player cost of $161 million per club in 2014, which was the union’s requested number for that year. The March 11 proposal had the 2011 cap at $141 million (union was at $151 million;  NFL at $131 million; NFL clubs said “we’ll split the difference”), rising to $161 million in 2014 (meeting the union’s demand for 2014). That’s a 14 percent increase in three years ($20 million per club) and $2 billion more in player costs than was spent in the previous four years. Then the cap would be mutually re-set in 2015. The clubs would guarantee those 2011-2014 numbers even if revenue did not meet projections. Clubs actually spent $140.6 million in 2009 and $138.4 million in 2010 on salary and benefits. So the $141 million proposed cap for 2011 was higher than the actual cash spending of 2009 and 2010.

Smith: “This lockout will cost every team’s city $160 million in lost revenue for a year. $160 million.”

FACT: Those numbers were conclusively refuted by independent economists in a story by Eric Stirgus of the Pulitzer Prize-winning Politifact.com and the Atlanta Journal-Constitution. Stirgus consulted a number of experts and posted links to four of the economic impact studies he reviewed. He concluded: “Each independent expert we talked to believed there will be little economic impact if there is no NFL action next season, since they believe people will find other ways to spend their money. We rate the NFL Players Association’s claim as False.”

Smith: “The fundamental principle of our business model necessarily includes that every player only plays for an average of 3.2 years.”

FACT: The average career length for a player who spends at least three games in one season on the active and/or inactive rosters and/or injured reserve is 5.3 years. In addition, the average career length for a first-round draft pick is 9.3 years.

Smith: “You have a group of owners who don’t want financial transparency, who don’t want us to understand the true financial picture of football.”

FACT: The NFL publicly released its proposal to the players on March 11. We offered to show the union five years (2005-2009) of year-by-year league-wide operating profits based on audited club reports reviewed and confirmed by Deloitte & Touche. We offered to show the union the number of clubs that had declines in operating profits from 2005-2009, and by how much on a cumulative basis, again based on audited financial statements. We offered the NFLPA the ability to review Deloitte’s work. We also offered to give five years (2005-2009) of audited individual club financial statements to a third-party accounting firm to verify for the union the profitability data provided to the union. And there were no conditions put on the information offered, meaning that they could have asked for more.  But the union’s concern was giving up its public relations position. As linebacker Hunter Hillenmeyer wrote in an NBC Chicago blog post on April 1, “It’s true, the NFL did offer some financial info towards the end of mediation. We rejected it, not because nothing is better than something, which it is not, but because the perception would then be that we got what we needed.”

NFL Charities awards $1 million in grants to current & former players as part of annual player foundation grants

NFL Charities, the charitable foundation of the National Football League, has awarded $1 million in grants to support 87 charitable foundations of current and former players.

Players receiving grants this year include New Orleans Saints quarterback Drew Brees, Indianapolis Colts quarterback Peyton Manning and Kansas City Chiefs guard Brian Waters and former players Derrick Brooks, Kurt Warner and Steve Young.  The grants, which are distributed in amounts up to $50,000, are part of NFL Charities’ annual player foundation grant initiative.

“We are proud to support current and former player foundations and applaud all players’ efforts to make their communities healthy, happy, and safe,” said NFL Commissioner Roger Goodell, president of the NFL Charities board of directors.

The NFL has long supported players’ philanthropic endeavors, and NFL Charities has awarded more than $17 million to player foundations over the course of two decades.  Current and retired players that have received NFL Charities grants in previous years include Carolina Panthers wide receiver Steve Smith, free agent Jason Taylor and Dallas Cowboys tight end Jason Witten and former players Troy Aikman and Dan Marino.

NFL Charities is a non-profit organization created by the 32 member clubs of the National Football League to enable the teams to collectively make grants to charitable and worthwhile causes on a national scale. Since its inception, NFL Charities has granted more than $140 million to more than 1,400 different organizations. NFL Charities’ primary funding categories include: sports-related medical research and education grants; player foundation grants in support of the philanthropic work of current and former NFL players; impact grants to support national youth health and fitness education initiatives as part of a league-wide commitment to fight childhood obesity; financial assistance for former NFL players in need via direct support to the NFL Player Care Foundation; and team program grants that supplement the charitable and community activities of the 32 NFL clubs.
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Panthers’ Jerry Richardson & Packers’ Mark Murphy send letter to all retired players highlighting benefits proposed on March 11

Carolina Panthers owner Jerry Richardson and Green Bay Packers president Mark Murphy — both former NFL players and members of the NFL’s negotiating team – today sent a letter to all retired players outlining the benefits they would have received in the NFL’s March 11 proposal to the NFLPA.

Below is complete text of the letter.

Dear Retired Player:

On March 11, the NFL Players Association – which states that it represents players “past, present and future” – walked away from the bargaining table, announced it was giving up its status as a labor organization, and sued the NFL in Minnesota.  As retired players who are members of the owners’ bargaining committee, we have a unique perspective because we understand these issues from all sides.  More importantly, we understand the challenges former players and their families face. 

The union walked away from mediation, cutting off negotiations on an offer that was made by the clubs to avoid a work stoppage and that would have provided important improvements in retired player benefits.  We know some former players have struggled financially.  This was a real attempt to address those financial concerns.  We are committed to making sure that when we reach a new agreement it better addresses the needs of our retirees.  It’s the fair thing to do.  It’s the right thing to do and it recognizes and respects your contributions to our game.

One of Commissioner Roger Goodell’s highest priorities has been meeting with retirees, their families, and those who advocate on behalf of retired players.  Leaders including Mike Ditka of Gridiron Greats, Bruce Laird of Fourth and Goal, and George Martin of NFL Alumni have met with NFL owners face-to-face to discuss issues affecting former players and their families.  We have developed a constructive relationship with these men and others who promote the interests of retired players.  Our bargaining proposals reflect the concerns we have heard, and we want to help.

George Martin was invited to speak to NFL owners at our recent league meeting in New Orleans. He again stressed the need for increased pensions and other improvements for retired players. George also reported to his board and chapter presidents that his subsequent meeting with the NFLPA-Retired Players Group in Florida did not go as well.  In a letter to his board, he described the atmosphere as “defiant, accusatory, and outright disrespectful.”

It is important to us that you know the facts about what we offered the union.  Among the elements of our March 11 proposal that would have improved benefits for former players are the following:

  • A new pension supplement for retired players aged 55 or above.  This supplement would give more than 2,000 retirees an immediate increase in pension payments averaging almost 60 percent.
  • Improvements in the Disability Plans and the 88 Plan to ease the qualifications for disability benefits and increase the value of those benefits to qualifying retirees.
  • Expanded career transition programs to assist former players in developing second careers, both in and out of football.
  • A new rookie pay system that would re-allocate more than $300 million per draft class to fund benefits for current and retired players.

These are significant offers that would have a measurable impact on the people who made football great.  Sadly, the players’ union wasn’t listening.

Nobody, least of all Commissioner Goodell and the owners, is pleased that negotiations broke down and that a work stoppage has begun.  But even though current players are locked out, the clubs will fully honor their commitments to you.  You didn’t cause this dispute, and you won’t have to pay for it. 

This means that despite various reports or comments to the contrary, there will be no reduction in any retiree benefit programs. We will continue to make all pension payments and contributions.  If you are currently receiving post-career medical benefits, you will continue to do so. There will be no reduction in payments or coverage under the disability plans or the 88 Plan.  And we will continue to accept applications from retired players for all benefit plans.  We’re serious about our commitment to you and we will keep our word.

For example, you asked for greater access to long-term health care, and so we recently instituted a new program to provide long-term care insurance for retirees.  Because the union refused to participate, this insurance program is being funded entirely by NFL owners. Transamerica Life Insurance is now contacting retired players to solicit applications.  Coverage may also be available to your spouse at a reduced premium. 

Further, the NFL will maintain the benefits available through the NFL Player Care Plan.  The plan provides joint replacement and assisted living benefits, a discount prescription drug card, neurological and spine treatment programs, a Medicare supplement program, and vested-inactive life insurance.  We did this to improve your quality of life off the field because you gave so much on the field.

An independent organization primarily financed by the NFL owners, the Player Care Foundation (PCF) was established to improve the quality of life for former players through financial grants and research.  PCF provides monetary grants to former players experiencing financial hardships, including grants to those who need assistance in paying for the costs of Player Care Plan programs such as joint replacement, spine treatment or neurological care.  PCF also sponsors cardiovascular and prostate screening programs.

For information regarding any of the above retired player benefits, programs, and services, please call the NFL Player Benefits Department at 1-800-NFL-GOAL (1-800-635-4625).

We want you to be fully informed, and to know the facts.  The NFL Players Association recently stated that NFL owners contribute nothing to the pensions of former players. (DeMaurice Smith on WFAN Radio in New York: “How much money do the NFL teams provide to the former player pensions? The answer is zero.”) In fact, in the past 10 years alone the NFL owners have contributed $2.7 billion to the funding of benefit plans for current and former players.  On March 30, NFL owners paid almost $180 million to fund pension, disability, medical and other benefits for the 2010 season. 

Commissioner Goodell and the owners are prepared to resume collective bargaining immediately.  The longer we wait, the more economically difficult it will be to reach an agreement.  When we do resume negotiations – and we will – our top priorities for a new agreement will include the benefit improvements described in this letter.  We do not know what the NFLPA may seek for current players, but we will not set aside your needs.  Your voice needs to be heard, and we will listen.

Sincerely,

Mark Murphy Jerry Richardson
President & CEO Owner/Founder
Green Bay Packers          Carolina Panthers
(Washington Redskins 1977-84) (Baltimore Colts 1959-60)

NFL owners pay $245 million into player benefits

The NFL clubs will complete their contributions toward 2010 NFL player benefits on Thursday, bringing the total amount funded by owners for the 2010 season to $245 million.

NFL owners will deposit $177 million on Thursday with BNY Mellon to complete the funding for the 2010 season. Ownership contributions fund player benefits that include the pension plan, group medical insurance, the disability plan, and the ”88” program for retired players with dementia or related conditions.

“NFL ownership is proud of the outstanding benefits that NFL players have enjoyed in recent years and the improvements that have been made for retired players,” said Carolina Panthers founder and owner Jerry Richardson, a former NFL player who co-chairs the NFL Management Council Executive Committee. “We have more work to do, especially for the retired players, and look forward to further improvements being part of the new NFL Collective Bargaining Agreement.”

In the past 10 years alone, NFL owners have contributed more than $2.7 billion for the funding of the various NFL benefit plans for current and retired players.

BNY Mellon is a leading investment management and investment services company based in New York City. It was established in 2007 from the merger of Mellon Financial Corporation and The Bank of New York Company.

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